Monday, December 15, 2014

"Challenges in Conducting a Christian Art Exhibition in India" by Paul Kattukaran

Please Note: All posts on this blog are intended for informational purposes only, not as an evaluation or endorsement of any artist, art form, organization or website.  If you have concerns about the accuracy of any information presented please contact the author at hmsarthistorian@gmail.com.

The coordinator of Indian Christian Artists’ Forum, Art-i, Fr Paul Kattukaran (r)
presents an Indian image of Christ "My Guru" done by the late Goan artist
Angelo da Fonseca to Archbishop of Goa and Daman Filipe Neri Ferrao as a
token of inculturating Christian faith in India.

For reflections on the challenges that have faced the Indian Christian Art Exhibition mentioned in my last entry, click here.  The post's author is Paul Kattukaran, the Coordinator of the Indian Christian Artists’ Forum (Art-i).  For a news story about the opening of the exhibition (pictured above), click here.

Despite several setbacks, Kattukaran writes:

With all the challenges, the exhibition of Indian Christian Art in Old Goa is a success on different counts; first of all most Goan Christians and many at the national level came to know of the exhibition through the print media and internet, especially UCAN news. Secondly, this exhibition inaugurated and blessed by the Archbishop of Goa has become a stepping stone for Christian Art ministry in Goa and India.

Thursday, November 27, 2014

Indian Christian Art Exhibition Opens in Goa, India

Please Note: All posts on this blog are intended for informational purposes only, not as an evaluation or endorsement of any artist, art form, organization or website.  If you have concerns about the accuracy of any information presented please contact the author at hmsarthistorian@gmail.com.

Angelo da Fonseca, Ecce Homo. 33x48cm

From the Times of India:
Goan artists bridged Christianity and eastern religions: ArchbishopTNN | Nov 26, 2014, 02.13AM IST 
OLD GOA: Archbishop of Goa and Daman Filipe Neri Ferrao inaugurated the Indian Christian Art Exhibition at Our Lady of Mount Carmel Archiepiscopal palace chapel, Se Cathedral premises, Old Goa. 
"This inter-religious dialogue was actively promoted by the likes of Angelo da Fonseca and Angela Trindade, both from Goa through their art, a bridge of understanding between Christianity and eastern, particularly, Indian religions," the archbishop said.  
The exhibition highlights the images created by the late Goan artists Angelo da Fonseca and Angela Trindade, apart from Alfred Thomas, Sr Genevieve SMMI and Sr Claire SMMI. The exhibition is conducted by Art-i, Christian Artists' Forum, Art-i established by the Office for Social Communications, Catholic Bishops' Conference of India, Delhi.
Fr Dominic Alvares SFX welcoming the archbishop and the dignitaries, said that the Indian Christian Artists' Forum has found a great patron in Ferrao in promoting the Indian images of Christ and the Goa archdiocese should lead other dioceses of India in promoting Indian Christian Art.
The co-ordinator of Indian Christian Artists' Forum, Art-i, Fr Paul Kattukaran presented an Indian image of Christ "My Guru" done by the late Goan artist Angelo da Fonseca as a token of inculturating Christian faith in India.
The exhibition will be open from 9am to 7pm everyday till the last day of the Exposition of the Sacred Relics of Saint Francis Xavier; January 4, 2015.

Monday, November 24, 2014

Ghanaian Jesus

Please Note: All posts on this blog are intended for informational purposes only, not as an evaluation or endorsement of any artist, art form, organization or website.  If you have concerns about the accuracy of any information presented please contact the author at hmsarthistorian@gmail.com.


Great image of a Ghanaian Jesus from Curious Christian, though I can't find any further information about it or the artist.  Please pray for Ghana and the rest of west Africa, that the Ebola crisis will be brought under control and lives saved.  As Ghana suffers, so does Christ.

Sunday, November 23, 2014

SouthWorld Article: The variety of Ethiopian crosses

Please Note: All posts on this blog are intended for informational purposes only, not as an evaluation or endorsement of any artist, art form, organization or website.  If you have concerns about the accuracy of any information presented please contact the author at hmsarthistorian@gmail.com.



Here's a short article from Southworld called "The Variety of Ethiopian Crosses."  It's a very brief review, but worth reading if you want to gain a basic understanding of the three forms of Ethiopian crosses.  One can also read a related article, "Ethiopia. The cross: symbol of a country", which discusses the importance of the cross to Ethiopian history and some historical cross variations and their symbolic associations/origins.  

Southworld web magazine is produced by the Comboni Missionaries, an international Congregation of Roman Catholic Religious working in forty-two countries throughout Europe, Africa, Asia and the Americas.

Friday, October 31, 2014

Orality Strategies - The Storying Gourd

Please Note: All posts on this blog are intended for informational purposes only, not as an evaluation or endorsement of any artist, art form, organization or website.  If you have concerns about the accuracy of any information presented please contact the author at hmsarthistorian@gmail.com.

From Orality Strategies:

The Storying Gourd, Peru.

In a traditional Peruvian art form, artists hand carve scenes onto a gourd. Several of them were on display in a particular artisan shop. A Christian worker had been storying with the shop's owner and he asked her about the carved gourds. She said that her father is one of the people who makes these beautiful gourds. The Christian worker told her the Creation to Church story and asked her if she could have her father make one of these gourds depicting that story. The shop owner told her father the story and drew the scenes out on a piece of paper. He carved a gourd to depict this story. 
Using local art forms is an effective way to connect Scripture to the traditional culture. It's also an incentive for artists to learn and contemplate biblical truth. Scripture enters their imagination and the imagination of people who see their artwork, which becomes a ready conversation-starter for talking about the stories of Jesus.
For more on orality, read "What is Orality?" on Orality Strategies' website, plus lots of other great info there.

Wednesday, October 22, 2014

Can Christians celebrate Diwali?

Please Note: All posts on this blog are intended for informational purposes only, not as an evaluation or endorsement of any artist, art form, organization or website.  If you have concerns about the accuracy of any information presented please contact the author at hmsarthistorian@gmail.com.


Here's some food for thought regarding the Hindu holiday Diwali, which is celebrated this year on October 24: the Morman-owned news organization Deseret News asks: "Can Christians celebrate Diwali?"  It describes various opinions regarding an altered, Christocentric version based loosely on some of the holiday's major themes (light vs. darkness, etc.).  I'm not taking a position on this article, just offering it as something to generate thoughts and discussions.

You can see my previous posts about contextualizing aspects of Diwali here and here.

Monday, October 20, 2014

The Jesus Question: Is giving Christ African features heretical, or at the very least neglectful?

Please Note: All posts on this blog are intended for informational purposes only, not as an evaluation or endorsement of any artist, art form, organization or website.  If you have concerns about the accuracy of any information presented please contact the author at hmsarthistorian@gmail.com.



Please head over to The Jesus Question for the introductory post on a book called African Theology in Images by Martin Ott, a 600-page exploration of the African Christian art that has come out of the KuNgoni Art Craft Centre in Mua, Malawi. This is the first of several posts that blogger Victoria Emily Jones plans to write about this important book. If you're interested at all in African art, Christianity, and contextualization, then please follow the rest of her thought-provoking posts about this book. And the rest of her blog is great as well!