Monday, January 26, 2015

Artist Safina Stewart Speaks About Australia Day

Please Note: All posts on this blog are intended for informational purposes only, not as an evaluation or endorsement of any artist, art form, organization or website.  If you have concerns about the accuracy of any information presented please contact the author at hmsarthistorian@gmail.com.




Today, January 26, is Australia Day down under.  Wikipedia writes that Australia Day


is the official national day of Australia... it marks the anniversary of the 1788 arrival of the First Fleet of British Ships at Port Jackson, New South Wales, and raising of the Flag of Great Britain at that site by Governor Arthur Phillip... With community festivals, concerts and citizenship ceremonies, the day is celebrated in large and small communities and cities around the nation. Australia Day has become the biggest annual civic event in Australia.

So, it's something like America's July 4th celebration.  In this video from 2014, artist Safina Stewart shares her perspective on the holiday as an Aboriginal Australian and Christian.  I think what she says here is very powerful and something that most white Christians (around the world) don't often hear.  Her sentiments are probably very applicable to Native Americans in the U.S. as well.  There certainly is a need all over the world for Christians of different cultural backgrounds to love and support one another.  Few of us do that well, myself included.  But we can be thinking and praying about it, and try to take small practical steps towards others in a spirit of kindness and friendship (like she mentions in the video).  To see and read about Safina and her art, visit her website Art by Safina.




Tuesday, January 13, 2015

Artist Fuses Mongolian and Native American Influences

Please Note: All posts on this blog are intended for informational purposes only, not as an evaluation or endorsement of any artist, art form, organization or website.  If you have concerns about the accuracy of any information presented please contact the author at hmsarthistorian@gmail.com.


Artist J.Bayarjargal (2nd from right) with her final student art project.

Mongolian Christian artist J.Bayarjargal is a recent art school graduate from the Mongolian University of Arts and Culture in Ulaanbaatar.  For her final project she created a series of seven leather disks based on the days of creation (and the first Sabbath) found in Genesis.


Bayarjargal has been a follower of Christ since 2006.  For her final art project, she wanted to create something that was a testimony to her professors about her faith in God's Son.  She says, "There is only one inspiration for my artwork [and] that is God and His mighty work that He has done for us."  She chose leather as her medium because her brother, who is also an artist, had previously worked with leather.

The round shape of Bayarjargal's leather pieces represents God's omnipotence, omniscience, and omnipresence.  She reinforces the idea of God's unchanging nature through the use of three colors throughout the seven disks: red, yellow and blue.  These are also the colors of the Mongolian flag.  Bayarjargal writes that red represents strength, decisiveness and power; blue signifies the eternal blue sky, with the different shades of blue in the leather disks symbolizing "the limitlessness of God in all areas."  Yellow equals clarity and light.  Using the same palette throughout the seven discs indicates that "everything [is] connected [and] related to one another [because of] the way He created them."


Monday, December 29, 2014

Entire Collection of Smithsonian's Asian Art Museum Online January 1, 2015

Please Note: All posts on this blog are intended for informational purposes only, not as an evaluation or endorsement of any artist, art form, organization or website.  If you have concerns about the accuracy of any information presented please contact the author at hmsarthistorian@gmail.com.

Debra Diamond, exhibition curator and Curator of South and Southeast Asian art,
gives a tour during a press preview of a 2013 exhibition at the Smithsonian's
Sackler Gallery in Washington, D.C.

From BLOUIN ARTINFO:

The 40,000-plus items in the Smithsonian’s DC museums of Asian art, the Freer Gallery of Art and the Arthur M. Sackler Gallery, will be available online starting on January 1, 2015. The high-resolution images will be accessible to all, without copyright restrictions for non-commercial use, an act director Julian Raby deemed “part of the democratization of art.” Many of the works — approximately 78 percent according to the Washington Post, or 35,000 according to The Art Newspaper — have never been seen by the public. [WP, TAN]

Thursday, December 25, 2014

A First Nations Retelling of the Christmas Story

Please Note: All posts on this blog are intended for informational purposes only, not as an evaluation or endorsement of any artist, art form, organization or website.  If you have concerns about the accuracy of any information presented please contact the author at hmsarthistorian@gmail.com.


One final Christmas Day post!


I had begun writing a longer post about this earlier this month, but apparently lost it before saving it.  Anyway, I wanted to get this online during the Christmas season.  

The Birth of the Chosen One is a forty-four page paraphrase of the story of Jesus' birth taken from Matthew and Luke.  The text is taken from the First Nations Version Project (FNV) by Terry Wildman.  Terry is of Ojibwe (Chippewa) and Yaqui ancestry. He is a recording artist, songwriter, storyteller, speaker and published writer. Terry is also the "Chief" of Rain Ministries, a nonprofit organization based in Arizona. Since the year 2000 as "RainSong" he and his wife Darlene have invested their lives in sharing the message of Jesus with Native Americans. 

The book's child-like illustrations were created by artist Ramone Romero of Cherokee and Aztec ancestry.  To see more examples of his artwork for the FNV, click here.

Indigenous Christmas Images

Please Note: All posts on this blog are intended for informational purposes only, not as an evaluation or endorsement of any artist, art form, organization or website.  If you have concerns about the accuracy of any information presented please contact the author at hmsarthistorian@gmail.com.

Here are a few examples of indigenous nativity art from from around the world to enjoy on this Christmas Day.

Photo: © Karen Elwell 2013
Engraved tree gourd from Pinotepa de Don Luis, Oaxaca. This is the work of master carver Antonio Guzman Hernandez.



Storyboard depicting Nativity, Keram River, Papua New Guinea



Mawalan Marika (1908-67), Nativity. C. 1964. 



Martina Parry, Nativity. 1993.



Aboriginal Stained glass window located in New Norcia, WA




Monday, December 15, 2014

"Challenges in Conducting a Christian Art Exhibition in India" by Paul Kattukaran

Please Note: All posts on this blog are intended for informational purposes only, not as an evaluation or endorsement of any artist, art form, organization or website.  If you have concerns about the accuracy of any information presented please contact the author at hmsarthistorian@gmail.com.

The coordinator of Indian Christian Artists’ Forum, Art-i, Fr Paul Kattukaran (r)
presents an Indian image of Christ "My Guru" done by the late Goan artist
Angelo da Fonseca to Archbishop of Goa and Daman Filipe Neri Ferrao as a
token of inculturating Christian faith in India.

For reflections on the challenges that have faced the Indian Christian Art Exhibition mentioned in my last entry, click here.  The post's author is Paul Kattukaran, the Coordinator of the Indian Christian Artists’ Forum (Art-i).  For a news story about the opening of the exhibition (pictured above), click here.

Despite several setbacks, Kattukaran writes:

With all the challenges, the exhibition of Indian Christian Art in Old Goa is a success on different counts; first of all most Goan Christians and many at the national level came to know of the exhibition through the print media and internet, especially UCAN news. Secondly, this exhibition inaugurated and blessed by the Archbishop of Goa has become a stepping stone for Christian Art ministry in Goa and India.

Thursday, November 27, 2014

Indian Christian Art Exhibition Opens in Goa, India

Please Note: All posts on this blog are intended for informational purposes only, not as an evaluation or endorsement of any artist, art form, organization or website.  If you have concerns about the accuracy of any information presented please contact the author at hmsarthistorian@gmail.com.

Angelo da Fonseca, Ecce Homo. 33x48cm

From the Times of India:
Goan artists bridged Christianity and eastern religions: ArchbishopTNN | Nov 26, 2014, 02.13AM IST 
OLD GOA: Archbishop of Goa and Daman Filipe Neri Ferrao inaugurated the Indian Christian Art Exhibition at Our Lady of Mount Carmel Archiepiscopal palace chapel, Se Cathedral premises, Old Goa. 
"This inter-religious dialogue was actively promoted by the likes of Angelo da Fonseca and Angela Trindade, both from Goa through their art, a bridge of understanding between Christianity and eastern, particularly, Indian religions," the archbishop said.  
The exhibition highlights the images created by the late Goan artists Angelo da Fonseca and Angela Trindade, apart from Alfred Thomas, Sr Genevieve SMMI and Sr Claire SMMI. The exhibition is conducted by Art-i, Christian Artists' Forum, Art-i established by the Office for Social Communications, Catholic Bishops' Conference of India, Delhi.
Fr Dominic Alvares SFX welcoming the archbishop and the dignitaries, said that the Indian Christian Artists' Forum has found a great patron in Ferrao in promoting the Indian images of Christ and the Goa archdiocese should lead other dioceses of India in promoting Indian Christian Art.
The co-ordinator of Indian Christian Artists' Forum, Art-i, Fr Paul Kattukaran presented an Indian image of Christ "My Guru" done by the late Goan artist Angelo da Fonseca as a token of inculturating Christian faith in India.
The exhibition will be open from 9am to 7pm everyday till the last day of the Exposition of the Sacred Relics of Saint Francis Xavier; January 4, 2015.