Thursday, August 27, 2015

Beautiful Jesus by Nigerien (Niger) Artist Mariama McCarthy

Please Note: All posts on this blog are intended for informational purposes only, not as an evaluation or endorsement of any artist, art form, organization or website.  If you have concerns about the accuracy of any information presented please contact the author at hmsarthistorian@gmail.com.


Beautiful Jesus, Mariama McCarthy
The introduction to a short interview with the artist, a Touareg artist from Niger who now lives in Maryland:
Mariama McCarthy is an inspirational artist whose works echo raw human emotion in beautiful and moving ways. A Touareg Frida Kahlo, some have said, but her art, as all art, transcends her identity, her own experience and her world reaching into the crevices of every human emotion no words could ever explain.

To read the rest of the interview, click here.

Thursday, July 9, 2015

OM Arts Training: Incarnate 2016

Please Note: All posts on this blog are intended for informational purposes only, not as an evaluation or endorsement of any artist, art form, organization or website.  If you have concerns about the accuracy of any information presented please contact the author at hmsarthistorian@gmail.com.



OM Arts Training:  Incarnate 2016
25 January - 16 May in Italy and Beyond

Intensive, holistic discipleship for artists —
in community with other accomplished artists gathered from around the world.  
Imagine together pursuing an integrated life of faith, creativity and cultural engagement.  

How would you be different?  What would this do for your art?  For the world?
Incarnate is a carefully honed program designed by artists for artists who are passionate about living well the Great Commission.

For applications and more info click here.

Tuesday, March 17, 2015

Patrick, Contextualizer of Christianity

Please Note: All posts on this blog are intended for informational purposes only, not as an evaluation or endorsement of any artist, art form, organization or website.  If you have concerns about the accuracy of any information presented please contact the author at hmsarthistorian@gmail.com.



A brief but well-deserved shout out to St. Patrick: The Missiology of St. Patrick by Jonathan Dodson at his blog, Church Planting Novice.  

Monday, January 26, 2015

Artist Safina Stewart Speaks About Australia Day

Please Note: All posts on this blog are intended for informational purposes only, not as an evaluation or endorsement of any artist, art form, organization or website.  If you have concerns about the accuracy of any information presented please contact the author at hmsarthistorian@gmail.com.




Today, January 26, is Australia Day down under.  Wikipedia writes that Australia Day


is the official national day of Australia... it marks the anniversary of the 1788 arrival of the First Fleet of British Ships at Port Jackson, New South Wales, and raising of the Flag of Great Britain at that site by Governor Arthur Phillip... With community festivals, concerts and citizenship ceremonies, the day is celebrated in large and small communities and cities around the nation. Australia Day has become the biggest annual civic event in Australia.

So, it's something like America's July 4th celebration.  In this video from 2014, artist Safina Stewart shares her perspective on the holiday as an Aboriginal Australian and Christian.  I think what she says here is very powerful and something that most white Christians (around the world) don't often hear.  Her sentiments are probably very applicable to Native Americans in the U.S. as well.  There certainly is a need all over the world for Christians of different cultural backgrounds to love and support one another.  Few of us do that well, myself included.  But we can be thinking and praying about it, and try to take small practical steps towards others in a spirit of kindness and friendship (like she mentions in the video).  To see and read about Safina and her art, visit her website Art by Safina.




Tuesday, January 13, 2015

Artist Fuses Mongolian and Native American Influences

Please Note: All posts on this blog are intended for informational purposes only, not as an evaluation or endorsement of any artist, art form, organization or website.  If you have concerns about the accuracy of any information presented please contact the author at hmsarthistorian@gmail.com.


Artist J.Bayarjargal (2nd from right) with her final student art project.

Mongolian Christian artist J.Bayarjargal is a recent art school graduate from the Mongolian University of Arts and Culture in Ulaanbaatar.  For her final project she created a series of seven leather disks based on the days of creation (and the first Sabbath) found in Genesis.


Bayarjargal has been a follower of Christ since 2006.  For her final art project, she wanted to create something that was a testimony to her professors about her faith in God's Son.  She says, "There is only one inspiration for my artwork [and] that is God and His mighty work that He has done for us."  She chose leather as her medium because her brother, who is also an artist, had previously worked with leather.

The round shape of Bayarjargal's leather pieces represents God's omnipotence, omniscience, and omnipresence.  She reinforces the idea of God's unchanging nature through the use of three colors throughout the seven disks: red, yellow and blue.  These are also the colors of the Mongolian flag.  Bayarjargal writes that red represents strength, decisiveness and power; blue signifies the eternal blue sky, with the different shades of blue in the leather disks symbolizing "the limitlessness of God in all areas."  Yellow equals clarity and light.  Using the same palette throughout the seven discs indicates that "everything [is] connected [and] related to one another [because of] the way He created them."


Monday, December 29, 2014

Entire Collection of Smithsonian's Asian Art Museum Online January 1, 2015

Please Note: All posts on this blog are intended for informational purposes only, not as an evaluation or endorsement of any artist, art form, organization or website.  If you have concerns about the accuracy of any information presented please contact the author at hmsarthistorian@gmail.com.

Debra Diamond, exhibition curator and Curator of South and Southeast Asian art,
gives a tour during a press preview of a 2013 exhibition at the Smithsonian's
Sackler Gallery in Washington, D.C.

From BLOUIN ARTINFO:

The 40,000-plus items in the Smithsonian’s DC museums of Asian art, the Freer Gallery of Art and the Arthur M. Sackler Gallery, will be available online starting on January 1, 2015. The high-resolution images will be accessible to all, without copyright restrictions for non-commercial use, an act director Julian Raby deemed “part of the democratization of art.” Many of the works — approximately 78 percent according to the Washington Post, or 35,000 according to The Art Newspaper — have never been seen by the public. [WP, TAN]

Thursday, December 25, 2014

A First Nations Retelling of the Christmas Story

Please Note: All posts on this blog are intended for informational purposes only, not as an evaluation or endorsement of any artist, art form, organization or website.  If you have concerns about the accuracy of any information presented please contact the author at hmsarthistorian@gmail.com.


One final Christmas Day post!


I had begun writing a longer post about this earlier this month, but apparently lost it before saving it.  Anyway, I wanted to get this online during the Christmas season.  

The Birth of the Chosen One is a forty-four page paraphrase of the story of Jesus' birth taken from Matthew and Luke.  The text is taken from the First Nations Version Project (FNV) by Terry Wildman.  Terry is of Ojibwe (Chippewa) and Yaqui ancestry. He is a recording artist, songwriter, storyteller, speaker and published writer. Terry is also the "Chief" of Rain Ministries, a nonprofit organization based in Arizona. Since the year 2000 as "RainSong" he and his wife Darlene have invested their lives in sharing the message of Jesus with Native Americans. 

The book's child-like illustrations were created by artist Ramone Romero of Cherokee and Aztec ancestry.  To see more examples of his artwork for the FNV, click here.