Friday, December 28, 2018

Please Note: All posts on this blog are intended for informational purposes only, not as an evaluation or endorsement of any artist, art form, organization or website.  If you have concerns about the accuracy of any information presented please contact the author at hmsarthistorian@gmail.com.

Once again it's that time of year to get new wall calendars! Although I won't be able to get one shipped to my current residence, here is at least one that you might be interested in:



Missio Art Calendar 2019 Ethiopia, available for 17,90 € or approximately $20 plus shipping to the U.S. (if available).

Here's the calendar description from the website (English translation by Chrome/Google Translate): 

Using the cycle of images created by Alem Getachew Worku for the missio art calendar, she takes inspiration from the color and design language of the Ethiopian-Christian painting tradition. 
Catchy and strong in color, the pictures give insights into the ancient Christian message of their homeland and convey what the artist herself is passionate about: to pass on the spirit of unity, of exchange and of sharing with her art. 
Alem Getachew, born in 1982 and confined to a wheelchair for 20 years by paraplegia, lives in Addis Ababa and has been working as an artist for 18 years. Very active and committed is above all the passing on of her abilities an important concern. In recent years, she has taught hundreds of people with and without disabilities art in her small gallery in Addis Ababa. 
Cover page and 17 four-color art prints, texts in four languages. 41 x 44.5 cm, with name tag leaf. Spiral binding, in a slipcase.

Unfortunately the calendar does not contain boxes for each day of the month, but rather shows one large art image with a horizontal line of dates in small print at the bottom. I was unable to determine if they ship to the U.S. or not.

Thursday, December 27, 2018

Nigerian Madonna and Child

Please Note: All posts on this blog are intended for informational purposes only, not as an evaluation or endorsement of any artist, art form, organization or website.  If you have concerns about the accuracy of any information presented please contact the author at hmsarthistorian@gmail.com.


© Michael Harrar

Michael Harrar, artist and member of Wycliffe Bible Translators, recently produced this delightfully colorful Nigerian Madonna and Child from his home in the U.S. Until earlier this year (2018) he and his wife Beverly had been living in Nigeria where he was able to personally research much of the imagery in this painting. You can see more of his (typically more realistic) paintings at his website Artist Works Around the Globe. Two other favorites of his is this one he did earlier in 2018 for the SIL Nigeria Retreat banner, and this one of female African musicians.

Here is the artist's description for Nigerian Madonna and Child:

Nigeria is a people full of color. Every Sunday men and women dress in their finest to celebrate their Lord and Savior Jesus Christ. Traditional Jewish custom is also full of color and celebration. Using vibrant African fabrics, colored pencil and acrylics, the Madonna and Child is influenced by living among the Nigerian people. A combination of traditional and modern Nigerian designs and Jewish symbols bring the past and the present together. 

Christ is for all time; the focal point where the past, present and future meet. Join together in celebrating the Lord Jesus Christ this Christmas.

Wednesday, December 26, 2018

Australian Aboriginal Nativity Card

Please Note: All posts on this blog are intended for informational purposes only, not as an evaluation or endorsement of any artist, art form, organization or website.  If you have concerns about the accuracy of any information presented please contact the author at hmsarthistorian@gmail.com.





I recently came across this beautiful Christmas card by Australian Aboriginal artist Raechel Saunders at her Etsy shop. Raechel is a painter, illustrator, and ceramic artist. Her abstract Aboriginal art style is heavily inspired by her artist/pastor/father's artwork and teaching. You can see even more of her work at her personal website.

Sunday, June 18, 2017

Engelbert Mveng: Ugandan Martyrs Altar @ ArtWay

Please Note: All posts on this blog are intended for informational purposes only, not as an evaluation or endorsement of any artist, art form, organization or website.  If you have concerns about the accuracy of any information presented please contact the author at hmsarthistorian@gmail.com.

Check out the most recent post at ArtWay featuring Cameroonian artist/theologian Engelbert Mveng, and two of his large-scale murals.  For more on Mveng and his art, check out my 2012 post here.

Engelbert Mveng: Ugandan Martyrs Altar, Libermann College, Douala, Cameroon.


Engelbert Mveng: Resurrection, Hekima College, Nairobi, Kenya, 1962.


Friday, December 23, 2016

Indigenous Painting: Holy Spirit in This Land

Please Note: All posts on this blog are intended for informational purposes only, not as an evaluation or endorsement of any artist, art form, organization or website.  If you have concerns about the accuracy of any information presented please contact the author at hmsarthistorian@gmail.com.


Holy Spirit in This Land by Lisa Buxton, Aboriginal Education Adviser, from the Catholic Education Office Sydney.  The painting was created to depict the theme of the inaugural Indigenous Mass at St Mary's Cathedral for Sydney's Catholic schools in 2013.  

The aim of the Mass is to show respect towards Australia's first people and to celebrate the indigenous culture and build bridges between indigenous and non-indigenous Australians.

Thursday, December 22, 2016

African Madonna

Please Note: All posts on this blog are intended for informational purposes only, not as an evaluation or endorsement of any artist, art form, organization or website.  If you have concerns about the accuracy of any information presented please contact the author at hmsarthistorian@gmail.com.

A striking Madonna image from MUTI, a creative studio founded in 2011 and based in the city of Cape Town, South Africa.  Click on the image for a larger version.



Sunday, June 12, 2016

The Image of God in an Image Driven Age

Please Note: All posts on this blog are intended for informational purposes only, not as an evaluation or endorsement of any artist, art form, organization or website.  If you have concerns about the accuracy of any information presented please contact the author at hmsarthistorian@gmail.com.


Check out Victoria Emily Jones' review of The Image of God in an Image Driven Age: Explorations in Theological Anthropology (Downers Grove, Illinois: InterVarsity Press, 2016) at her blog, Art & Theology.  She writes that the book

delves into [the imago Dei] doctrine, examining its implications for relationships, ethics, sexuality, consumer visual culture, art making, dissemination of the gospel, and more. Comprising twelve essays that resulted from the 2015 Wheaton Theology Conference, the book explores what it means to be made in God’s image and issues a challenge: that we resist all the false images that try to topple the one true image in our lives.

Of special interest to readers of this blog would be her comments on Chapters 7 (“What Does It Mean to See Someone? Icons and Identity” by Ian A. McFarland), 10 ("The Sin of Racism: Racialization of the Image of God" by Soong-Chan Rah) and 12 (“The Storm of Images: The Image of God in Global Faith” by Philip Jenkins).